by Susanne Kemp

Firefighters across New Zealand and around the world are marking International Firefighters’ Day today, May 4.

As the IFFD home page notes, “Firefighters dedicate their lives to the protection of life and property. Sometimes that dedication is in the form of countless hours volunteered over many years, in others it is many selfless years working in the industry. In all cases it risks the ultimate sacrifice of a firefighter’s life.”

In Third World countries, firefighting is an especially hazardous job due to widespread very poor health and safety conditions in factories, sweatshops and other workplaces and the under-spending on public services such as firefighting.

Bangla Desh firefighters and emergency workers

For instance, in the Tazreen Fashion factory fire in Dhaka, Bangla Desh, in 2012, at least 117 died while 200 were injured.  At the Kader Toy Factory fire in Thailand in 1993, despite the desperate efforts of firefighters, somewhere between 190-210 workers, mainly young women from rural areas, were killed and over 500 were injured.  The workers were locked inside the factory and firefighting crews were delayed by traffic jams in the area. (This fire is the subject of Don McGlashan’s powerful ‘Toy Factory Fire’ song on his first solo album.)

While we should think about the dangers faced by firefighters in NZ, we should never lose sight of the additional horros facing firefighters in countries like Thailand and Bangla Desh, including the horror of not being able to save people in fires like the above two.

International Firefighters Day itself came into existence in 1999, when a proposal was emailed out to fireifghters across the world, following the deaths of five comrades  trying to contain and put out a massive bushfire across the ditch in the Australian state of Victoria.

In New Zealand, the people who do this work show their humane values not only by fighting fires but also in their solidarity with other workers.  Firefighters have been on the picket lines in significant numbers supporting the Ports of Auckland workers under attack a few years ago and supporting hospital workers in Auckand in 2016.

At Redline, we have been proud to run substantial coverage of firefighter issues and struggles across New Zealand and the Victorian firefighters stoush with a state government there which was determined to undermine their conditions and weaken their union.  We have also had some coverage of British firefighter issues, including a major interview with a London organiser of the Fire Brigades Union.

For our coverage click on the links below:

Firefighters blast new Fire and Emergency organisation legislation

Firefighters black entire unsafe fleet

Firefighters’ union blasts leadership structure of new Fire and Emergency service

Firefighter News: Fire Service still resisting IFE payments based on prior learning; the new Fire and Emergency Service

Firefighters call for solidarity with Auckland hospital workers

Fire Service undermining prior learning of firefighters

Christchurch firefighters angry that five years on not a single fire station rebuilt

Small win for firefighters

2.7% rise for the firefighters, 70% rise for their boss

Australian and New Zealand firefighters hold joint conference 

Firefighters giving a lead 

Auckland firefighters solidarity with wharfies 

Firefighters resist vindictive new attack by employers 

Australia:

Vicious state-media assault on Victoria firefighters

Britain:

Interview: British firefighter organiser Paul Embery on firefighter issues, the state of the working class and the Brexit vote

British firefighters union statement in light of Brexit vote

Interview with British firefighter union activist on pensions battle

British firefighters’ solidarity with Turkish firefighters

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Comments
  1. Chris Slee says:

    A recent article from Green Left Weekly on the firefighters dispute in Victoria (Australia):

    https://www.greenleft.org.au/content/medias-war-firefighters

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