National government Blues

Posted: June 1, 2014 by Admin in Labour Party NZ, National Party NZ, New Zealand economy, New Zealand history, New Zealand politics, Unemployment

by Don Franks

(tune: “Browns Ferry blues”)

 

Here comes John Key with a smiley faceJohn-Key-and-baby

And a big stick handy just in case

Lord, lord, got those National government Blues

My good friend just got in shit

‘cos Paula pinched his benefit

Lord, lord, got those National government Blues

 

Judith Collins had a narrow squeak

Rewarded with a high paid holiday week

Lord, lord, got those National government Blues

Bill English balanced up the books

A dollar for us and a grand for the crooks

Lord, lord, got those National government Blues

 

Now little David says he’ll slay the giant

But he’s just as capitalist compliant

Lord, lord, got those National government Blues

Lord, lord, got those National government Blues

Lord, lord, still got those National government Blues.

 

 

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Comments
  1. daphna says:

    John Minto’s piece on the Daily Blog today makes clear just how much the Internet Mana Party have hitched their wagon to Labour. Their desire to be a juniour partner in a Labour-led government has become the raison d’être . It is in keeping with elevating the “get rid of the government” mantra, at the expense of any other cause. http://thedailyblog.co.nz/2014/06/02/a-new-spirit-of-hope-for-the-coming-election/

  2. Phil says:

    Not only John M, but also the left groups remaining in Internet Mana appear to have gone backwards on Labour.

    Opposition to the twin parties of capitalist management in New Zealand should be a non-negotiable principle in 2014. It should have been decades ago.

    When a real anti-capitalist left of some size emerges in New Zealand, opposition to Labour alongside opposition to National, will be a starting point.

    Until then, outside Redline, a few class-struggle anarchists and a few other consistently anti-capitalist individuals, we currently have a left that, whatever any of its sections’ some time rhetoric, is essentially liberal/social-democratic rather than truly anti-capitalist.

    Talk of being anti-capitalist without intransigent opposition to the Labour Party is, to take a phrase from a great Irish working class leader, “mere wind and attitudinising”.

    Phil